Cannabis Soft Drinks May Set the Industry Ablaze

Cannabis Soft Drinks May Set the Industry Ablaze

From candy to lotion, CBD (cannabidiol) has found its way into many ordinary household products. Yet, CBD-infused soft drinks are few and far between. Is that set to change?


Squeezing the Juice from the Fruit Beverage Market

Squeezing the Juice from the Fruit Beverage Market

Historically, a simple mention of “100% Juice” was sufficient to encourage a consumer to purchase fruit beverages based on what appeared to be a healthy choice. However, with greater consumer awareness of the sugar content of juice, the movement of consumers away from sugary beverages, and the decline of traditional breakfast habits, fruit beverage shipments have been on a recent decline. As manufacturers change their product lines to appeal to new consumer habits, a range of new beverage options marketed as healthy has entered the market.


Watering Down The Beverage Industry

Watering Down The Beverage Industry

Consumers are increasingly choosing bottled water over carbonated soft drinks and other beverages due to greater awareness of the negative health effects associated with beverages containing sugar and artificial ingredients. Furthermore, the use of flavor drops enable consumers to customize their drink with as much or as little flavor and sugar as they desire.


Bubble Trouble: Carbonated Soft Drinks Facing Production Declines

Bubble Trouble: Carbonated Soft Drinks Facing Production Declines

US beverage production is forecast to reach 48.4 billion gallons in 2021. Increasing population and disposable personal income levels will help drive volume gains as consumers purchase more beverages. Rising output of drinks in categories such as bottled water and alcoholic beverages will offset declines in carbonated soft drink (CSD) production.


Shift to Cans Gaining Steam Among Craft Brewers

Shift to Cans Gaining Steam Among Craft Brewers

US beer demand is forecast to reach 6.6 billion gallons in 2021. Rising disposable personal income levels will stimulate consumer spending on beer. However, over the 2006-2016 period, demand for beer in volume terms fell at an average annual rate of 0.3% as the market matured and beer lost market share to other alcoholic beverages, especially among key demographics including baby boomers and millennials.